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Bleeding Royal Blue

Inside the mind of a Kansas City Royals fan

Month

December 2013

I See Your Ballot, and I Raise You My Votes

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The announcement for just who(or won’t) be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame won’t be announced for close to two weeks, but the debate will only intensify during that time. I’ve written more than my share about not only the Hall of Fame but also my thought on cheaters in the game. Joe Posnanski even goes a step further, saying the Hall needs to take the lead. To be honest, in a lot of ways I’ve grown tired of the subject and the hypocrisy of the whole situation. So instead of discussing the whole reason the Hall is missing star players from the “Steroid Era”, I thought today I would go through the Hall of Fame ballot, and like the BBWAA has to, pick my ten votes for the Hall. It’s not as easy as you think, as a few deserving candidates have to left off due to the backlog of talent being left behind. So here are my ten votes, not in any particular order:

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1)Craig Biggio

Craig Biggio  didn’t get in last year on his first year on the Hall of Fame ballot, despite the fact that his numbers are those of a HOFer, & he is someone who was never thought of as possibly taken steroids. I mean, seriously–look at him! With that said, I understand why some voters are leery on Biggio. For one, he played for 20 years, with a lot of those years near the end nowhere near Hall of Fame caliber. The prevalent thought was that if Biggio hadn’t held on, he wouldn’t have reached 3000 hits, which normally grants you an easy slide into the Hall. Biggio also wasn’t a big power hitter, or just a pure great hitter like a Tony Gwynn or a Wade Boggs. No, what Biggio was was a consistent performer that went out there every day and gave his all. Sure, that alone won’t get you into the Hall. But when you add in him being a 7-time All Star, a 4-time Gold Glove winner, and was 3 times in the top ten of the MVP voting, you have a Hall of Fame candidate. But all this isn’t the most impressive of his feats. No, Biggio’s biggest feat was that he did all this while changing positions multiple times. Biggio went wherever the Astros asked him to go, whether it was catcher, second base, left field or center field. He was an All Star at both catcher and second base, which within itself is a huge accomplishment. Most players who get moved around that much don’t keep up their All Star numbers, let alone put together a Hall of Fame career. But Biggio did.

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2) Jeff Bagwell

If there is one player on my ballot that I feel has been robbed, it’s Jeff Bagwell. There has never been a sign that Bags used any illegal substance. No proof that used the same substances that so many of his peers did during that era. Yet…he is lumped in with them because “he looked the part”. Ridiculous. I’m not saying he didn’t; there is no way for me to know that. What I am saying is assuming because he had muscles that he used is putting the cart before the horse. Judgment like this is why I hate what the voting process has become for the Hall of Fame. Anyway, I obviously feel Bagwell is a HOFer, and looking at the numbers it’s not hard to see why. Rookie of the Year in 1991, 4-time All Star, won the NL MVP in 1994 and was in the top ten of the MVP voting another five times. Bagwell also won the Silver Slugger Award 3 times and won a Gold Glove in 1994. If that isn’t enough, his 12 years of being one of the top players in the NL and a career WAR of 79.5 ranks him at 63rd OF ALL TIME. Jeff Bagwell hit, hit for power, stoles bases and was an above average defensive first baseman. Bagwell should have been a no-brainer, and it does seem as if support for his HOF case is growing. In Bagwell’s first year on the ballot, 2011, he received 41.7 % of the vote. Last year it had grown from 56% to 59.6%. It has grown enough that it is realistic to think Bagwell will(eventually) get elected to the Hall and rightfully so.

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3)Mike Piazza

Mike Piazza , like Jeff Bagwell, was lumped in as a player suspected of steroid use more by looking the part than actually having proof. That can be the only reason, as the argument can be made that Piazza is the greatest hitting catcher of all time. Piazza wasn’t the greatest defensive catcher you have ever seen, but he worked hard to get better and was heralded more than once for being a good game caller behind the dish. Obviously the biggest argument for Piazza to be inducted is his bat. Sure, he never won a MVP award, but the list of accomplishments he racked up are a nice consolation. 12-time All Star(including 1996 All Star game MVP), 1993 Rookie of the Year, 10-time Silver Slugger award winner, and was in the top 5 of the MVP voting four times. You could read the numbers all day but few, if any, catchers can match up with Piazza. He should have been a first ballot HOFer, and eventually he will get in. The question is just when.

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4) Tim Raines

I’ll be honest–I showed up late to the “Tim Raines   should be in the Hall of Fame” party. Most of my viewing of Raines was late in his career, where he was a solid outfielder who wasn’t an All Star but was still a great addition to your roster. After really viewing the stats, Raines compares very closely to Rickey Henderson, who was a no-brainer HOFer. Raines led the NL in stolen bases  four times, was a 7-time All Star, won both a batting title and a Silver Slugger Award in 1986 and was Rookie of the Year in 1981. The reasoning behind my vote for Raines is easy; he did a little bit of everything, did it above average, and did it for a long period of time. You really didn’t see Raines have a drop off in production until 1994, which was 14 years into his career. “Rock” got on base, stole bases, hit for average, hit for extra bases, drove in a decent amount of runs for a guy who batted lead-off, and was solid on defense. If not for Henderson, Raines would have been the measuring stick for lead-off hitters of his era. Rickey unfortunately overshadowed Raines, which would be a big reason why he hasn’t gotten the vote support he probably should have. In Raines first year on the ballot(2008), he got 24.3% of the votes. Since then he has bumped all the way up  to 52.2% this past year, a lot of it thanks to a number of voters championing his cause. He only has a bit over 20% of the vote left to get, and it’s conceivable to see him get that within the next few years. Once you really sit down and look at everything, it  becomes very obvious that Tim Raines should be voted in. In due time, my friends, in due time.

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5) Greg Maddux

I’ll go ahead and say it; next to Roger Clemens, Greg Maddux is the greatest pitcher I have ever seen. This will be the first year Maddux is on the ballot, and it seems pretty apparent that he will get voted in this year. Honestly, anyone who doesn’t  vote for him just doesn’t get it. Sure, the accolades say a lot; 4-time Cy Young award winner, 18-time Gold Glove winner, 8-time All Star, won the NL ERA title four times, twice lead the league in win-loss %, four times lead the league in WHIP, nine times lead the league in walks per 9 innings, and has the 25th best WAR of all time. ALL TIME! Maddux is what every pitcher should strive for, even if they are unable to perform as well as he did. Maddux understood not only the strike zone, but understood how to throw batters off of their game. Maddux changed speeds, changed locations, and batters had no clue what to expect from him. I have never seen a pitcher who located the ball as well as Maddux did. This might have been my easiest pick for a vote. Greg Maddux is an easy pick for the Hall of Fame.

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6) Tom Glavine

When mentioning Maddux, you pretty much have to mention his former teammate, his left handed counterpart Tom Glavine. During the Atlanta Braves heyday in the 90’s, Glavine was just as important to those teams as Maddux was. Glavine is also on the ballot for the first time this year, and although not quite the no-brainer that Maddux is, Glavine is just as deserving to go into the Hall. Glavine was a 2-time Cy Young award winner, ten time All Star, the 1995 World Series MVP, and even a 4-time Silver Slugger winner. Glavine wasn’t overpowering, but he knew how to pitch. He was also about as consistent as they come. Up until the last five years of his career, Glavine was a consistent 200 innings pitcher who always gave his team a chance to win. He didn’t have a fastball that popped the glove. He didn’t celebrate on the mound or draw attention to himself. Tom Glavine just went out there and won. For that, he should be in the Hall of Fame.

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7) Frank Thomas

Frank Thomas (nicknamed “The Big Hurt”) is the last of the players who are on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time that I would vote in. Thomas was not only a great hitter, but a great hitter with a good eye at the plate. Frank would just as likely take a walk(he led the league in walks four times) as take you deep. Just how good of an eye did he have? He led the league in OBP four times, OPS four times and OPS+ three times. Sure, the last half of his career was spent at DH, but he isn’t going into the Hall of Fame for his defensive prowess.  No, Thomas mashed the ball, and in some ways, took the art of hitting to another level. He was a 2-time MVP winner, but also finished in the top five four other times. It’s actually amazing he only won one batting title(1997), since he was as just a good a hitter as Gwynn, or Boggs, but had a ton of power as well. Late in his career, after it seemed like Thomas was washed up, he bounced back and had a monster season in Oakland in 2006. He parlayed that into another solid season the following year in Toronto, but after that he would last only one more year in the majors. Thomas had a ten year stretch where he was one of the best hitters in baseball. Dominance gives you a plaque in the baseball Hall of Fame.

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8) Edgar Martinez

Edgar Martinez is that interesting case that is very polarizing for the voters for the Hall of Fame. On one hand, Martinez being a full-time Designated Hitter for the majority of his career hurts him in the eyes of some voters. But does that matter when you are the greatest DH of all time? The argument for or against is logical, so it comes down to how you feel about a guy who hardly played in the field. Me? I feel like if a player is so good that he is considered the benchmark for that position(to the point the award for Designated Hitter of the year is now named after him), then it doesn’t matter that he doesn’t play a defensive position. Edgar hit, then hit some more, and just kept hitting. He hit so well that he is 76th in career WAR amongst position players, a stat that combines offensive and defensive stats. His hitting was so good that it didn’t even matter that he didn’t add anything defensively. That is raking. The honest truth is that the Designated Hitter is still a position, whether or not he wears a glove. The position isn’t going away, so the voters should realize they have to acknowledge it exists. Maybe they should look at it from this view: they wouldn’t be voting for a DH. They would be voting for one of the greatest hitters of his era, a player who’s numbers match up with the all time greats. If that doesn’t mean you should get a vote, then I’m not for sure what voters should be looking for.

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9) Roger Clemens 

My last two picks are possibly the two biggest lightning rods of the entire ballot, but I honestly believe they both deserve in. First on the list is Roger Clemens , one of the greatest pitchers of all time. Obviously, the steroid issue looms heavy over his consideration, and maybe even more because he so steadfastly denies everything. Taking the needle(or the lotion) out of the equation, Clemens stands tall as THE pitcher of his era. His 7 Cy Young awards(SEVEN!!!) alone should get him in the hall. In my eyes, Clemens is up there with the Walter Johnson’s and Sandy Koufax’s in baseball lore. I get why some don’t vote for him, and they have every right. Personally, I think it looks bad that after all this time he denies everything so vehemently. Normally where there is smoke there is fire. But maybe the most intriguing part of “The Rocket’s” case is that the argument could be made that he was a Hall of Famer before his supposed steroid use. To me, that makes the case even sadder. No one is arguing that Clemens should be in the Hall. No, the argument is the circumstances, circumstances that I feel baseball allowed to happen. So in my eyes, he should be in.

Barry Bonds Convicted Of One Count Of Obstruction Of Justice

10) Barry Bonds

Speaking of polarizing, there is no player more polarizing than Barry Bonds. Here are the facts: Barry Bonds is one of the greatest baseball players of all time. He is the all time home run king. He has also always been a major league jerk, which never helps his case in these situations. And like Clemens, Bonds was a Hall of Famer before his supposed steroid use. In fact if you have read “Game of Shadows” , you know that a big part of why Barry supposedly  took steroids was because he was jealous of Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa getting all the attention when he knew he was the better all around ballplayer. Barry was right; he was. Barry was that one talent who could do everything; hit, hit for power, run, and field. In all honesty, his name should be discussed with Ruth, Williams, Mays and Mantle. Instead, steroids is all that is discussed, and is why he already isn’t in. Like Clemens, he is the best player of his era. Like Clemens, I would still vote for him. Doesn’t mean I like what he did, but he wasn’t the only one, and it was allowed to happen. You can’t just erase a part of history because you don’t like it. You can’t erase what Barry Bonds accomplished.

So there are my ten votes. There were a few other players I would have voted for, like Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro, and Mike Mussina, but you have to go with the ten best. I also wouldn’t have voted for Jack Morris, who seems to be a hot button topic. I just don’t feel he is a Hall of Famer. It will be interesting to see how the voting goes on January 8th when the ballots are tabulated. I think at least a few of these players will get in this year, but not as many as they should. Hopefully sometime in the near future, the Hall of Fame decides on set rules for the writers to vote on, so we aren’t stuck with the limbo the voting is in now. The “Steroid Era” happened folks…it’s not any worse than the racism that permeated baseball for many, many years. Acknowledge the era and put in the best players of that period. Doing what they are doing now just puts more attention on what is already a subject most of us are tired of. Do what’s right and let’s move on.

 

Questions with Getzie: The Sayanara Edition

Chris Getz

It’s been a few weeks and Chris Getz is still no longer a member of the Kansas City Royals. The Royals non-tendered Getz on December 2nd, and all signs point to the team not going back on this decision(be honest–a part of you wondered if Dayton would turn around and sign him to a minor league deal). With Getz’s time seemingly over with the Royals, it seemed only fitting to let Getzie answer some questions (or how I think he would answer them) and say goodbye to all of his fans(all five of them). So before his bags are packed and he heads to a minor league park near you, here, one last time, is Questions with Getzie!

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Chris, how have you been since the Royals let you go? Any offers on the horizon?-Independence, MO

Golly, I’ve been great! Sure, I miss all the guys from the team, but this is just part of the game. When it comes to offers, I haven’t gotten any yet, but I’m not worried. There is always something around the corner. There’s always team’s on the look-out for a gritty, average baseball player who can only play one position!

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Getzie, what do you think you will miss most about Kansas City & the Royals in particular?-Robert, Tonganoxie, KS

Shucks, there is so much I will miss. I’ll miss the fans. I’ll miss the barbecue. I’ll miss the security guards that question whether or not I am an actual baseball player. But more than anything I will miss Dayton & Ned. I consider them my best friends and even have them as friends on Facebook & MySpace! They really understand my game and what I can bring to a ball club. More than anything, they let me bunt as much as I want and actually encourage it! I’ve never had that kind of support and understanding like I’ve had with those two. I’m going to miss my late night talks with Ned…I can only hope I can still call him if I have a problem or if I think something scary is under my bed. It’s going to be a tough adjustment to be away from them!

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The Royals have gone out this winter and strengthened their roster. How do you feel about these moves and you not getting to be a part of it?-Zach, Gladstone, MO

Wowsers, Dayton has really made some good moves! Vargas is a solid addition to the rotation, and I like the trade to get Aoki. I feel bad I won’t be around just to say his name everyday! Also, I really think adding Omar Infante was a great plus for the team, even if it cost me my job. I wish I could be around next year, but it just isn’t meant to be. I will at least be around in spirit, and who knows; Ned has mentioned he’d love to get my number retired at ‘The K’!

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NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! Sweet baby Jesus, NO! I will never forget you, you beautiful man! You didn’t deserve to take a shot on that rugged and handsome chin!-Lee, Kansas City, MO 

Lee, don’t fret. You have my phone number…and my e-mail address…and we can chat on Skype…you can text me whenever you want. Actually, don’t do that. Nicky thinks it’s creepy how often you try to get a hold of me. You might just stick to sending me something on my pager. That should work.

Chris Getz

Ha! Look who has a job now and who doesn’t! Sure, I might be forever stuck in Omaha, but I can still say I am employed by a major league baseball team! Suck it, Getz!-Johnny, Metairie, LA

Oh Johnny, I will miss talking to you the most! I hope someday your dream of being a major league ball player comes true and whoever this man that keeps you down is, I hope he realizes what a sweet little boy you are! Some day you will get to play ball and even be tall enough to ride on all the rides your little heart desires! Good luck!

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With you gone, who is left to hit home runs for the Royals?-Michael, Manhattan, KS

Good question. I have no clue. I think the Royals home run numbers will go waaaay down in 2014 without me there. It’s impossible to replace this kind of power.

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Chris, normally I would gloat here. Sure, I had a smile on my face that a Cheshire cat would be proud of when I found out you were non-tendered. I’ve been asking for you to be gone for awhile now. But in some ways, I will miss you. You were a great muse for me. Thank you for that. Also, I can’t be too mad at you. I mean, look what you married:

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Respect, bro. I’m sorry to see us part ways. So because of that, I am here to offer you a job. I need someone to clean my house. You up to it? I’ve heard you are #MistakeFree…-Sean, Emporia, KS

I’ll miss you too, buddy. Every good guy needs his inept second baseman to get him riled up. I was that for you. Best of luck. The job offer? Golly Gee, ask me again in April.

Moose’s Warning Track(s)

Mike Moustakas,  George Brett

Dayton Moore strikes again this off-season, pulling off a trade of role players today with the acquisition of Danny Valencia from Baltimore for outfielder David Lough. On first glance, it looks as if Moore traded a player who didn’t really fit into the Royals plans in 2014, and turned him around for a guy who could be a backup infielder. But it goes a bit deeper than that.

MLB: Kansas City Royals at Baltimore Orioles

Valencia was once a prospect for the Minnesota Twins back in the day, but it didn’t take long for him to wear out his welcome. The Twins, after figuring out that Trevor Plouffe(PLOUFFE) could put up even better numbers than Valencia, traded Danny to Boston in August of 2012. Valencia was then traded to Baltimore just a few months later, where Buck Showalter figured out that he was a better role player than a regular. In fact, throughout his career, Valencia has struggled against righties but flat out massacred lefties:

Split            G GS  PA  AB  R  H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO   BA  OBP  SLG   OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB ROE BAbip tOPS+ sOPS+
vs RHP as RHB      31  68     64 13  0  1  4  10  0  0  4 18 .203 .250 .422  .672 27   3   0  0  0   0   0  .214    51    91
vs LHP as RHB      43 102     97 36 14  0  4  13  0  2  4 15 .371 .392 .639 1.031 62   2   0  0  1   0   1  .405   133   175
vs LH Starter   30 30 116 111 15 39 14  0  5  14  0  1  4 20 .351 .371 .613  .983 68   2   0  0  1   0   1  .391   122   172
vs RH Starter   22 11  54  50  5 10  0  1  3   9  0  1  4 13 .200 .259 .420  .679 21   3   0  0  0   0   0  .206    53    88

When used in the proper context, Valencia’s value shot way up. In fact, this would probably be why the Royals were so interested in him.

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Mike Moustakas struggled in 2013. Like, “Jeff Francoeur is batting better than me” struggles. Moose’s first half last year was downright putrid. After coming off of a pretty good sophomore year in 2012, things seemed to be looking up for Moustakas. Sure, he suffered through a knee injury late that year, but he was healed and looked to grow on 2012. Instead, the bottom fell out. Every know and then we would see a glimmer of the Moustakas we thought he could be, but then he would fall back into another slump. He hit so many pop-ups last year that I started making up distance totals of all of them to determine just how much distance was accumulated and if it would wrap around ‘The K’. To make matters worse, Moose never got the hang of it against lefties:

Split             G  GS  PA  AB  R  H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO   BA  OBP  SLG  OPS  TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB ROE BAbip tOPS+ sOPS+
vs RHP as LHB       128 396    365 89 22  0 10  32  2  2 23 60 .244 .295 .386 .682 141  11   5  0  3   1   1  .265   109    83
vs LHP as LHB        66 118    107 21  4  0  2  10  0  2  9 23 .196 .256 .290 .546  31   2   0  1  1   0   0  .229    69    70
vs LH Starter    34  24 109 104  3 20  2  0  1   8  1  2  4 20 .192 .220 .240 .461  25   3   0  0  1   0   0  .226    43    30
vs RH Starter   102 102 405 368 39 90 24  0 11  34  1  2 28 63 .245 .304 .399 .704 147  10   5  1  3   1   1  .266   116    96

To put it bluntly, Moustakas stunk in 2013, and it only seemed apparent that the long leash the team gave him last season wouldn’t carry over to 2014. It only seemed to make sense to give him some competition.

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That would be where Valencia slides in. Moose can’t hit lefties. Valencia can’t seem to hit righties. Literally, this is a perfect platoon, and there is a good chance that is what will happen. But this is also a wake up call to Moose. Moustakas up to this point has probably been given the benefit of the doubt thanks to him being a first round draft pick. Most teams, and especially the Royals, give their top draft picks a longer leash than a normal pick. The Royals were also in a position to where they weren’t winning, so taking your time with letting a player grow wasn’t a problem. But the Royals are now in a position where they can be a contender, which means they can’t afford to have a third baseman that has an OPS of .651. So this trade is what you think it is; a message to Moose that if he falters next year, they already have his replacement handy. Will there be a battle for the position in Spring Training? Possible. If I had to guess though, it is Mike’s job to lose. Unless he just downright stinks up the joint come spring, I would bet he is in the starting lineup come Opening Day. The Royals are going to give him every opportunity to succeed. But if he struggles like he did this past season, Valencia can step in.

David Lough

So what about David Lough? Well, there was a good chance that Lough wasn’t in the Royals plans in 2014. The outfield is set with Gordon, Cain and Aoki, and the Royals like having Jarrod Dyson on the bench.  Lough is out of options, and doesn’t have the power bat that Justin Maxwell possesses. So with that in mind, it made sense for Dayton Moore to see what Lough’s value was and see if he could swing a deal to bring someone in that would help the team more in 2014. With that, Dayton accomplished his goal. Look, I like Lough. I think he would be a great fourth outfielder, and he showed last year that he can play all over the outfield and was a good spot starter. But he will be 28 next month and most guys who don’t see regular playing time in the majors until late in their 20’s don’t have great careers. In all honesty, there is a good chance 2013 will be his peak. Even if not, the Royals had no spot for him, and Baltimore had a need. I hope Lough gets a chance to play quite a bit for the O’s, and I’ll be rooting for him. It’s sad to see him go, but baseball wise it makes sense.

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It’s hard for me to say this, but Moore has pulled off another good trade. This off-season he has realized how to recognize the strengths the Royals have and trade from that to pick up pieces for next year’s team. Valencia should be a solid bat off the bench, and a probable starter at third base against southpaws. The real value in the trade will be determined on how Moustakas reacts to a little bit of competition. If it causes him to step up his game, it is a win-win. Moose will have earned his keep at third while having Valencia be a solid bat with some pop. If Moose continues to struggle, the Royals at least have a guy who can fill the role and not be completely lost. But I have a feeling if Valencia accumulates more than 450 at bats, we have a problem. Time will tell, but looking at this deal right now I only see the Royals getting stronger. One more solid starter( maybe a #2) and this team can be a serious playoff contender. Work still needs to be done, Dayton, but things are looking up.

Royals at the Winter Meetings: Dayton Rides Space Mountain

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Baseball’s Winter Meetings were taking place this week, and it seemed as good a time as any for the Kansas City Royals to go in and stock up on some needs the team has going into the 2014 campaign. The team was still in need of a second baseman, a power bat and possibly one more starter(cause let’s be honest–you can never have enough starting pitchers!). Instead…well, there was a lot of talking, but not any actual action on the Royals part. Since there were at least some hot rumors about the Royals, let’s dive into those rumors.

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Carlos Beltran Possibly Returning Home

Before the 2013 season had even ended, many a Royals fan would get giddy when the thought of Beltran reuniting possibly with the team that he began his major league career with. Then when word got out that the Royals were actually pursuing Beltran…well, safe to say Royals fans lost their minds(literally)! I even got caught up in the excitement, as the thought of adding a power bat to the lineup seemed rather enticing. But it didn’t take long to start seeing the cracks in this plan. For one, if Kansas City signed Beltran, there was a good chance Billy Butler was getting traded. Say what you will, but outside of last season’s off-year, Butler has been about as consistent for the Royals as you can ask of a player. Two, with the Royals already needing a big bat, adding Beltran then trading Butler would have meant they still needed another bat. Third, Beltran turns 37 in April and already has gotten to where he can’t play in the field on a regular basis. Fourth, most talk was that he was asking for a three year deal, which means he would be close to 40 by the end of the deal and more than likely a regular DH. And fifth, at that point the Royals would need money both to re-sign James Shields and/or Alex Gordon, and there was a good chance that money would be tied up on a player whose best days were in the mirror. So at the end of the day, it might have been a good thing Beltran decided to hop to the Bronx and take some Steinbrenner money. Sure, the idea of Beltran propelling the Royals to the playoffs would have been a great story, and he would have been a God in Kansas City. But the idea is more enticing than the actual reality.

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Omar Infante Might Stay in the American League Central

Word has been going around all week that the Royals are making a run at former Tigers second baseman Omar Infante. This has been an interesting story to follow for a few reasons. It appears that once again, the Royals are going up against the Yankees in pursuit of a free agent, as they are looking to replace Robinson Cano. The sticking point seems to be that Infante wants at least three years, with some reports even saying he wants four years. I don’t know about you, but that seems like a lot for a guy who will soon be 32 and isn’t an elite performer at his position. Now, with that being said, I like Infante. He’s a contact hitter who gets on base consistently and plays solid defense. He would be the kind of player you want up at the plate when you just need a single. So if the Royals got him for 1 or 2 years at $8 million a year, I would probably be okay with that. 3 or 4 years? Ummm….and that is where the issue lies. It’s very apparent the Royals need an upgrade at second base, but if it’s 3 to 4 years or nothing, I could live with Emilio Bonifacio roaming second. Time will only tell if Infante ends up in Royal blue, but I tend to think whether or not a signing like this would look good matters on the years, not the dollars. Like Beltran, you don’t really want to put that many years into a guy who is on the regression portion of his career.

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Rumors Abound

It just wouldn’t be the Winter Meetings without a bunch of rumors making the round. Here is just a taste of some of those rumors that have floated around this week:

Royals in on Mark Trumbo

Rangers once interested in Billy Butler, who could still be traded if they sign Nelson Cruz

Rockies still interested in Royals bullpen arms

Royals interested in Jason Hammel

Royals have shown interest in Johan Santana

Royals look into retiring Chris Getz’s jersey

Okay, I made that last one up. But you see the variety of rumors that have popped up just over the last few days. I actually think the idea of signing someone like Johan Santana to a low end,  incentive laden contract isn’t a bad idea. Because of them being a small market team, Kansas City has to be creative at times and look into guys coming off of injuries who might still have some life left in their arms. I also thought it wouldn’t have been a bad idea to go after Bartolo Colon, but he’s headed to New York to ruin the Mets’ post-game spreads and bathrooms(not exactly in that order). On the other end of the spectrum, the idea of Trumbo or Cruz signing just worries me. I know the Royals need power, but they don’t need guys who aren’t good defensively, strike out a lot, and don’t get on base enough(Trumbo). For now, these are all just rumors. But it does make you wonder what isn’t even leaked out if this is the stuff that actually gets out to the public. And sometimes what does leak out scares you a bit. Like this…

MLB: JUN 21 Diamondbacks at Royals

Royals Might Already Have an Extra Bat  

Word also got out this week that if Kansas City doesn’t do anything to beef up their lineup, they are okay with that. Why you ask? Because they feel the addition of Alex Gordon to the middle of the lineup will be like adding another bat. {Sigh}. Look, I love Alex Gordon. Next to maybe Alcides Escobar, he is probably my next favorite Royal. He is as good as advertised. I just wonder if he will produce as good in the middle of the lineup. Every time they have tried to move A1 to that part of the order, he hasn’t been awful, but he hasn’t batted as well as he does at the top of the order. Doesn’t mean I don’t think he can be the bat they want him to be, it just means history has shown he just doesn’t seem as comfortable batting 3 thru 6 as he does batting leadoff. I would actually be more intrigued at putting him second in the order behind soon to be leadoff hitter Nori Aoki. That way Gordon is still near the top of the order while still having your top hitters at the beginning of your lineup, which is what you should do anyway, right? I still think it would be smart for Kansas City to acquire another bat for the middle of the order, but if not it could be interesting to see how Gordon does batting (probably) fifth. Hopefully I am wrong and he flourishes. Looks like either way we are probably going to find out.

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Dayton & Ned say stuff; I Shake My Head   

Finally, it wouldn’t be a proper off-season without Dayton Moore and Neddy Yost making a bunch of comments that make me shake my head. There’s this. And this. Now, I didn’t get too worked up over either interview, as I’ve learned to take anything these two say with a grain of salt. Sure, a lot of what they say they mean, which scares me. But part of it is just normal interview, PR stuff that really doesn’t mean anything. I’ve also learned that if they are talking, I’m probably going to disagree with what they say, so it’s best to let it go in one ear and out the other. This will probably be the way it is as long as the two of them are employed by Kansas City. At the end of the day, it’s all just words until actions back up what they are saying. Since that doesn’t always come to fruition, it’s easier to not get too worked up over what is said. I just hope the two of them got to go on Space Mountain(WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!) during their time in Florida. That and I hope they are used to the roller coasters, because I’m not getting a real positive vibe off of their moves this off-season. It is only December; by February we could be having a completely different conversation. Strike that–I hope we are having a different conversation. Make it happen, Dayton. All I want is smart moves that are in the best interest of this ball club. Do that and I won’t complain–too much.

Ramble On: Royals Notes of Interest

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With the Hot Stove season in full tilt, and the Winter Meetings coming up fairly soon, I thought today we would take a look at some items of interest going on with the Kansas City Royals.

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Obviously the main news is the Royals have discussed a trade with the Colorado Rockies and Dexter Fowler has been the main Rockie of interest discussed. Word is that Colorado really likes Wade Davis and might be willing to make a Davis/Fowler trade straight up. Names also mentioned on Kansas City’s side have been Aaron Crow and Tim Collins. Basically, the Royals are willing to part with their surplus of great arms in the pen to fill a hole elsewhere on the diamond. Smart move in that regard and Fowler is about the level of player you would get for a reliever. But would this move be an upgrade? I have been hemming and hawing all day, going back and forth on whether or not this would improve the Royals both offensively and defensively. Fowler has great speed, is only 27, a switch hitter with some power and even takes a walk(the Royals must not know this yet!). Fowler has also been fairly injury prone, has not produced big numbers at Coors Field despite his home/road splits( At Coors: .298/.395/.485 Away: .241/.333/.361 for his career) and for some reason doesn’t have the best defensive metrics. So would he be an upgrade? Probably, but not by much. I tend to think using a platoon of David Lough/Just Maxwell with Jarrod Dyson occasionally filling in for Lorenzo Cain in center field with Cain then sliding over to right to be about the same as if the Royals go out and get Fowler. Fowler is still only 27 years old, so there is a chance he hasn’t reached his peak yet. It would be great for the Royals to be the benefit of that upside, but the possibility of regression is there as well. Either way, I have a feeling we won’t hear anymore on this front until a decision has been made on Carlos Beltran, either way.

George Kottaras

Almost a week ago, the Royals traded backup catcher George Kottaras to the Chicago Cubs for cash. The week before he had been taken off the 40-man roster to make room for newly signed pitcher Jason Vargas. At the time it seemed like an odd move, as Kottaras was a very serviceable backup for catcher Salvador Perez and quite possibly the best pinch hitter the team had on their bench. The running joke was that Kottaras was either going to do one of two things when he was at the plate: take a walk or hit a homer. Kottaras easily was one the most patient hitters for the Royals in 2013 and might have been the most patient I have seen in a long time. So seeing him get cut seemed a little out of place. But there were rumblings that this was a financially inspired move. Even Bob Dutton heard from a Royals official who said this was a money move. So how much money would Kansas City save if Brett Hayes ends up being the Royals backup catcher this year? $500, 000. So this could be about finances–hell, Kottaras was traded for “cash considerations”. But I think one more thing factors in here: Ned Yost is a former catcher who loves his catchers to play great defense. Nothing wrong with that, in fact I am a big proponent of holding on to great defensive catchers. But Kottaras wasn’t chopped liver behind the dish; word was that he called a good game and worked really hard to make sure he was fully prepared for every start. Add in his patience at the plate(with some pop, may I add) and logic would tell you to stick with Kottaras for one more year. Instead he will head to Chicago and the Royals will go with either Hayes, or Francisco Pena. Neither will put fear in opposing pitchers. Though not a big deal, it’s a move that just doesn’t sit well with me.

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Speaking of things that don’t sit well with me, the Royals gave General Manager Dayton Moore a 2-year contract extension on Black Friday. At the time it felt like a move tucked away on the busiest shopping day of the year, a holiday weekend where few would pay much notice. It still feels that way, as I have to believe the Royals realized it wouldn’t be a popular move. I’ve said my peace on GMDM more than once, and in a lot of ways don’t want to just retread the reasons I feel the Royals are held back by having Moore as their GM. If you want to read my thoughts, read this. It pretty much sums up my thoughts. Craig Brown of Royals Review hit the nail on the head, which I pretty much completely agree with. Now, the extension isn’t a big surprise. Once Yost’s contract was extended, it seemed like just a matter of time until Dayton received his extension. Even if you are like me and wish the Glass’ had waited a few months into the season before extending his contract, Sam Mellinger makes some good points as to why the Royals needed to give Dayton the extension. So I get why this was done; I just don’t think it is in the best interest for the future of this ball club. Hopefully I am wrong and the Royals will flourish, contending for the foreseeable future. But there is a better chance the last seven years are a better indicator of what we should expect.

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Finally, it just doesn’t seem right for me to write up some Royals thoughts without mentioning the fact that CHRIS GETZ IS NO LONGER A KANSAS CITY ROYAL!!!!! Anyone who knows me or has read this blog knows I am not a big fan of Mr. Getz. I have felt for awhile that the Royals should part ways with ‘The Man Who Was Mistake Free ‘. I poked fun at him with a fake mailbag column. Actually, come to think of it, Getzie was a pretty good muse for me. He brought out the sarcasm in my writing, sarcasm that doesn’t always show up in print. At the end of the day, Getzie was allowed to be a regular part of this team for way too long, or at least too long for a very average player. As a human being, I wish the best for him in the future…as long as it is far away from Kansas City. As a Royals fan, I am elated he is finally gone. I’m sure some will say I’ll have to find some other player to poke fun at now that ol’ Getzie is gone. I would counter that I am looking forward to not having a player on the field that I don’t feel belongs. I’ll feel even better about this if the Cardinals pick him up. I’m off to party now, to celebrate Happy ‘Chris Getz is No Longer a Royal’ Day–but I have a feeling this isn’t the last word from me on Getzie. There might be one more mailbag in me…until then, let’s celebrate!!!

                     

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